One thing that is well-noted by little noted about the recent failed toner cartridge bombings is the fact that the key element to finding the packages was the exact tracking package numbers.

So technology that we all use daily, that is deeply integrated with our favorite search engine, that allows us to see where our eBay purchases are at any given moment, is the same technology that was used to find these bombs.

Good stuff.

September is National Preparedness Month, so I didn't want the month to pass without sharing what I learned about making a Go Bag.

First off, here's a quick link to an Amazon store where you can buy a lot of the stuff you'd need to put in a go bag.

I kinda went crazy recently with researching and purchasing items for emergency kits for the family. And since the Internet is the place where other people's nuttiness saves other people time, I figured I would share. So here ya go:

Here's a complete set of photos of all the stuff in one of the bags:

The completed bag (not too shabby, bulk-wise, but enough stuff in here to keep your act together for a while!):


Here's all of the supply/ tool-type stuff:

Supplies + Tools

Here's the food (such as it were):

Foods (such as it were)

And a late entrant (forgot the bungees + rope):

Rope and Bungee Cords (added later)

Here are the best of the links where I found out most of my info:

10 day survival pack for your vehicle for just $25 by Jeffrey Yago, P.E., CEM Issue #104. Amazing set of "food" in there.

Bargain Babe» How to make an emergency kit for less than $22. Nice tips of swooping up household stuff and squirreling it away.

Emergency Car Survival Kit. The cell phone idea is pretty awesome (still hafta do that).

Here's the Coup de grâce — an Amazon store with every damn thing you might possibly need for your go bag, pre-selected for you:

Lastly, we've got a video of me explaining the contents of one of the bags to S-L, with the kids as cameramen:

Explication of Our Go Bag from Daniel X. O'Neil on Vimeo.

Let me know what you think!

Someday we won’t consider any part of this a failure.

Social media play key role in Boulder fire – Lost Remote.

When the Boulder Sheriff’s emergency alert system failed, its emergency operations center asked that residents use Twitter and Facebook to help spread the word of mandatory evacuations, reports the Boulder Channel 1 Blog. The hashtag #boulderfire has become a lifeline of sorts for many looking for the latest information on the fire, as well as people and businesses offering to help evacuees.

Friendfeed for watchlists!

New DHS program to automate transmission of watch list data — Government Computer News.

DHS and the FBI’s Terrorist Screening Center (TSC), which maintains the consolidated database, are putting in place a program called DHS Watchlist Service (WLS). WLS will replace multiple data feeds from TSC to Homeland Security agencies that handle various missions such as counterterrorism, law enforcement and border security, the department’s privacy office said in an assessment of the program.